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Mandela 10, Nelson Mandela 10, South Africa 8, Us 7, America 5, Seoul 4, The Nation 3, China 3, Iran 2, Maryland 2, Los Angeles 2, Colorado 2, Arkansas 2, D.c. 2, Texas 2, Washington 2, Disas 1, Obama 1, Mandell Mandela Itt 1, Frederick 1,
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  Al Jazeera America    News    News/Business. Breaking and in-depth coverage  
   from America and around the world. New. (CC) (Stereo)  

    December 8, 2013
    12:00 - 12:31pm EST  

tensions on the nation. n'beating in the major winter storm. >> remebering nelson mandela
today marks the beginning of a week of commemoration. south afte afterallan how are pg nelson mandela and his legacy. >> well rochelle they are celebrating nelson mandela with song and chanting and fraser prd laughter. it's been an open air festival all day long. earlier today we went to a huge catholic church not too far from here celebrating his 50th anniversary and celebrates the life of one of the world's great statesmen. attendance today mor more than a thousand. >> the sounds of sowest tweto an
that is not just another sunday the congregation of the largeste church celebrates mandela in song and prayer. as similar services are held across south africa in a day of reflex. reflection. we gather here to thank god for his life and we thank god for the blessings that he bestowed on the life of ma d ma. madiba. >> the police were sending tear gas inside of the church to get him out. it was very bad. father sebastian show us the bullet holes from a decade ago.
we could have filled them saul l but we kept them as a reminder as to why this is so important. >> that is what the congregation remembered today. a message rest o mess resonatind white. >> he has already paved the way for us we have to walk on the path. i think it's important that mandela liberated all. he liberal rated wasp south africans from being the scum of the earth. >> they remember mandela. they remember the will legend. >> does the future worry you? >> yes. >> everyone in the throa streetd celebrating and how do we
translate that to some of the mistakes he made when he left office. >> this country has extremely high unemployment and low consumer confidence. there is a lot of work to be done to match the promises made 20 years ago. >> a lot of promises unfilled. >> let's go to los angeles now where many are gathering to pay their respects from nelson mandela. he visited the city in 1990 and brian, mandela holds a special place for those parishioners whawhatyoucan caught tha can call that his home church there in la. there is going to be a special service in an hour dedicated to mandela. there is a morning service going on right now that mandela was mentioned. this is a critical church in los
angeles and very important. the center of the community. people rear al here alt all of s that nelson mandela was in prison felt a special connection to him. he came here after he was released from prison. they feel they were home with nelson mandela after he was released from prison. we got to speak to the pastor here. >> it was difficult for memorializement it will b. it will be a life long for again races. generations. the memory is not going to die out in the next three or four generations. the history books will hold a clear record of what he has done. and his life will be larger and more impactful in 10 or i 15 or 1220or 25 years than it has been
the last few years. >> i asked him how do you memorialize nelson mandela in a few minutes of being able to speak. that is his answer. you don't do it in a one hour sermon. you remember and memorialize nelson mandela basically forever. he was that big of a character to the world and certainly to the first african methodist church. >> you membe memorialize him inw you live your life. ththe movement being a acceleras release from prison. and joining me is the student body pres president from the university. and we are honored to have him here this morning. >> professor, is it fair to sayt
the anti-apartheid movement had it's roots at your campus? i think that is a stretch. it was a movement that was all throughout america. it touched many campuses. the labor movement played a big role. and the caucus at the african embassy played a role. i don't think berkley should be singled out. the pro tests were larger at berkleigh. berkleigh -- berkley but it was a broad national movement. >> how did it play out on your campus. it was a response to the struggle heating up in south africa. for the first time it was a very big public boycott of the
election and we saw police beating down demonstrators and the brutality of that government and there was in return a response to the united states. that rekindled the anti-apartheid movement in this country. it started small and grew and grew. on the berkley campus it went from a handful of students to being thousands of students and faculty and staff and i. >> were you having conversations with your parents explaining to your parents why you were doing this? >> many of us did. particularly when we were arrested and we were seen on tv confronting the police. these were tense times and it was a bit different from the 60's. it was different in that ours was a movement in solidarity with the people in south africa. we were keenly aware we had our own issues namely racism and
other oppression, we were focused on south africa and the university's invotemen investme. and many of us didn't want to distract by making it police brutality and keep the focus on south africa. we managed to keep it prod and managed to prevent the pola polarzation that you saw on many campuses in the 60s and we had many police officers who saw what we were doing and many officials. >> n't and thand the reason whye governor decided it was in his interest to support us. when did you get the feeling beinthatsthat this was working. >> i remember a heated and vie lenvie -- violent protest in berkley the images of police
tearing down shanno shannon shaw that they were watching us in south africa and we were having an impact. and when they overturned the sanctions and his own party turned on him. we had been a part of an effort to change a tide of opinion in america. >> you perhaps had a role in electing a president because obama became politically active in that as well. >> many young people myself and the president included got our start in activit activism in ths movement. and it has a long term impact in that way. >> professor thank you so much for the conversation >> nelson mandela was a love of boxer. he had one regretted admittedl.
increasing tensions in asia. >> south korea has an expanded air defense zone which overlaps with the one last month that zone is one that is disputte diy the countries. >> south korea ma dispute may be about invisible lines on land. the strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seoul as part of their ex-clu exclusie economic zones. now south africa has asserted their rights from above. the new korean airspace defense identification zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight region this modified zone increased the air zone over the waters.
waters. seoul's move comes two weeks after china's air defense identification zone encroaching on korea a and japan. the government of seoul say they won't enforce the rules until december 18th. we don't believe this will impact the ro relationship with china florida anchina and japan. southeast asichina which releasf militaryicmilitary excises exerl stay in communication with seoul.
china's actions last month have given them a chance to do that. it leaves one part of the east china sea with three overlapping zones. the coming days could allow for talks on how to manage a complex state of affairs. they could set the stage for what nobody wants, an accidental conflict in increasingly tested skies. >> coming up next the latest on the major winter storm that has killed four people and knocked out power and creating dangerous conditions across the country. that current and much more with al jazeera america returns.
welcome back to al jazeera america i'm rochelle carey. the nation's heartland took a beating from a major winter storm. today it's heading straight to the east coast expecting snow, ice and freezing rain to stretch froto
boston to texas. >> auta cold snap is blanketinga large section. in texas a ice patch sent a driver out of control and flipping a vehicle out of control and into the icy waters. the driver was killed in the crash. rescue teams were called in to lift the vehicle from the ladies anlake.they are -17-degree temps and they to get into dry suits to lift it out. >> traffic was backed up for miles. black ice forcing drivers to creep along roadways and some ways conditions so bad people are braving the frigid temperatures and walking to work. >> the back road and the neighbourhoods it's really bad. >> the freezing weather is knocking out power. tens of thousands at dallas-fort
worth international airport 400 flights cancelled and passengers setting up camp on the floor. >> the weather is going to hold until after the weekendmen week. i'm going to hunker down. the storm stretching far north into minnesota and north dakota where temperatures offe whoeverw decembedegrees above zero. in the bay area several people have died from hypothermia. a million dollars worth of the citrus damaged by the freezing temperatures. there are not many cars on the streets in newburg, indiana. one young woman is making the best of the ar artic artic blas. it's not technically winter but what a mess out there.
>> it's a mess and it's going to get worse as a matter of fact. as we look at the nation's capitol a beautiful sight there. we see overcast skies and the visibility hasd diminished an hour ago. this comes maryland back to washington, d.c. and frederick, maryland is a disas at the and t now. and everywhere you see a diamond in black and that is an accident. we want folks to stay at home if you can. a mess along i-70. the quite visibility has diminid and the snow is falling. we track into tonight and tomorrow morning if you are traveling along i-95 use
precaution. >> a potential la potentially mk through in the fight against cancer. doctors in new o new orleans saa gene treatment fo. >> a team of inspectorse inspecs toured the nuclear facility in iran. president obama says the pursuit for the lon longstanding deal is likely to fai fail as it is to psyched. psyched -- succeed. iran is to rollback tha their enrichment of uranium that is used to build a nuclear bomb but it's also used to generate nuclear energy. >> we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible
for iran for like any country to change overtime. it may not be likely. if you ask me the live life andd that we are about to arrive at the instate that i described earlier it was more than 50/50. we have to try. >> iran and the u.s. and five other world powers will meet in the coming days to discuss implementing an agreement on iran's program. the deal which lifted sanctions on iran has benefitted his country's economy. >> controversy over the latest projectproject on artist cristo. some say it will damage the eco-system. >> it's called "over the river". the arkansas in south central colorado.
what cristo wants to do here is suspend hundreds of huge panels of silvery cloth nearly six miles of it in eight sections along a 42-mile stretch of the river. the drawing shows how the sun light will filter through the fafabric. >> the best way to see it is underneath on a raft drifting through big horn sheep canyon. >> we have 300,00 300,000 raften the summertime and that is spectacular to experience the project. >> it's a created play of light passing through the fabric reflecting through the water. up, not down. cristo and his team have been working for "over the river" for more than 20 years. they have had to get approval because much of the project is on emplo protected land. cristo is raising the $50 million that it costs by selling hundreds of works which
he makes by hand. he and his wife became famous for their out sized and ou out outlandish projects and "over the river" is no different. >> our minds is in the journey when thousands of people are trying to stop us. the public hearing are opposition you are part of the project. willing or unwilling you are related to the project. >> cristo says he and jean claude scouted all over until they decided that this one was peperfect for their project. but critics say it's anything but an ideal operation. >> it's on the scale of a mining operation. >> ellen is a vice president for rags over arkansas river.
the group has taken legal action trying to stop "over the river" saying the work to install the anchors and cables and fabric is damaging to the environment. >> cristo's team say they'll minimize the damage and others say they support the project. >> i think it will create a lot of attention for this part 69 of colorado. and if i it will do a lot to pus area on the map. >> assuming he wins the legal wrangling construction will take two years and when it's completed it will be up to are two weeks. he is famous for out maneuvering and out lasting his opponents. at 80 years old it could be one of his last works. >> coming up nelson mandela was
an avid boxer with the love -69f sports. the ledg legendary free dom figr has one reget. we'll tell what you that is when we return. of the people until we restore our freedoms atñ
welcome back to al jazeera america i'm rochelle kya care-y. >> more french troops are i in e south african colony. thousands of fled the capital. nelson mandela had one great regret in life he never became a boxing champ. he never made a name in the ring but he was inspired in the gym he trained.
>> this street once hosted apa apartheid bloodliest battle. outside of his house they played protest songs and ice-cream sellers hawked in two languages. and in a quiet corner he thanked mandela by teaching a different fight. he was once a champ but now he teaches kids to box because mandela asked him to. >> he said to me i must do this job. that is why i gave my life to the children. >> he teaches kids to take their anger out in the ring not in the streets. it's as difficult as the apartheid. iifso i went to boxing to show e children how much they lead in
life. >> namandel la loved boxing. and while owning south africa's first black law firm he train derailment here. >> he train trai trained here. today young men train in a moderate thmoderately new space. when mandela train derailment ts concrete. now they are free. >> thanks to mandela. thanks to mandela amen. >> thanks to mandell mandela itt inside of the ring. this is the equipment he used. >> out back the security guard showed me the equipment that he once used. memories of a boxer that fought
and won. >> travel conditions are deteriorating across the capitol right now that is a live shot of washington, d.c. the snow is coming down accumulating snowfall across the capitol. and now in new york city the clouds are on the way and so is the snow five inches of snow across virginia and i-81 is going to be treacherous. we are looking at rain on the backside of the system and temperatures are dropping down below freezing. everywhere you see a black die diamond that is an accident. i want everyone to use caution on the roadways.
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